• John Tooher
  • 15 February 2021 - 5:57
  • 1 comment

triangle showing three steps to making good strategic business decisions

As business owners and leaders, we often find it hard to make decisions about major challenges or the potential opportunities we need to tackle. There is a tendency to default to a wait-and-see strategy in the hope that things will somehow sort themselves out in the long run.

The reasons why decision making is hard are manifold, but the main reasons are:

 

  1. We are not always examining the root cause of the issues we are facing
  2. We lack the information and insight we need to make informed decisions
  3. Our information and knowledge are internal to our organization and may not be sufficient or state-of-the art
  4. We don’t have an overarching context on which those decisions can be based i.e., a long-term strategy

Strategy is a Pattern in a String of Decisions

The final point in my opinion is the most crucial. Someone once described a strategy as a pattern in a string of decisions. This is because those decisions have been made in the context of an overall plan to reach a desired future state.

I will be addressing each of the above in detail in future posts but for now I would like you to ask yourself the following questions:

 

  1. How often am I taking the time to get to the root cause of an issue rather than addressing the symptoms?
  2. Do I have a clear understanding of where I’m taking my business and am I using that understanding to make good decisions that help me get there?

I’m always available to talk about your experience in tackling the above and how I could help you do it better. Contact me at johnt@headroom.net or call 610.548.5278

 

SCHEDULE A STRATEGY CONSULTATION

 

One Comment

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  1. Wendy Isaacs

    February 18, 2021

    Just like in medicine, if you only treat the symptoms and don’t look deeper to identify the root problem, you’ll be creating a cyclical pattern of ‘thinking’ you’re fixing the problem, over and over again. It’s difficult to develop solutions when you’re only looking at symptoms that are often non-specific and hard to categorize. Figure out what’s causing the issue and you’ll be heading in a positive direction towards correcting underlying systems and processes.

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